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Windows 10 update to latest version

13

Comments

  • richard
    richard Member
    edited August 2020

    hi is anyone having this issue:  in the upgrader_default txt file i have the following message over and over


    battery monitor is waiting ...

    AC Power: sleep is already disabled

    isSleepDisabled1


  • richard
    richard Member
    edited August 2020

    hi is anyone having this issue:  in the upgrader_default txt file i have the following message over and over


    battery monitor is waiting ...

    AC Power: sleep is already disabled

    isSleepDisabled1


  • Thomas
    Thomas Member
    edited August 2020

    Hello,

    I have the same issue:

    battery monitor is waiting ...
    AC Power: sleep is already disabled
    isSleepDisabled1

    On some devices it will take up to 5 or 6 hours before update is pushed, on some devices nothing happens.

    Anyone knows?



  • Ken Gregory
    Ken Gregory Member
    edited September 2020

    This script meets the goal of silently upgrading to 2004 with an automatic reboot, and the lack of reboot prompt can be handled through good end-user communications. I've got several successful machines upgraded in testing. Unfortunately, I'm concerned about the machine performance during the upgrade and I'm very concerned about follow-up activities.

    I configured a new Agent Procedure to query the process Windows10UpgraderApp, aka Windows Upgrade Assistant. My agent procedure is stuck as pending for hours while the Upgrade Assistant is running and even an hour or two after the reboot. How do you know this script is actually working? The answer is that other agent procedures will be stuck as pending.

    While we keep telling clients that Kaseya is authoritative for all patching and updates, immediately after installing 2004 the Windows Notification Area is prompting for manual update installations. Does anyone have a way of blocking this so that Kaseya PM or SM can catch up?

    KG

  • Derek Harlan
    Derek Harlan Member
    edited September 2020

    I noticed the same thing when testing on my own laptop (1909 to 2004). I did notice that the registry key for the Disable Automatic Update was changed to 0 (from 1). Once I suspended and resumed my device in the Software Management module, shortly after that the registry key changed to 1 so after that change no prompts should be received regarding update installations. I'll have to wait until another update is available in Windows Update to verify that I'm no longer getting those installation prompts.

  • Ken Gregory
    Ken Gregory Member
    edited October 2020

    I discussed post-2004 activity with the Kaseya Helpdesk and I demonstrated my findings:

    -  Machine #1 - Patch Management - PM History compared to DISM package info

    - Machine #2 - Software Management - SM History compared to DISM package info

    Both machines took a day or two to install this patch: 2020-09 Cumulative Update for .NET Framework for Windows 10 Version 2004 for x64 (KB4576478) https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4576478/kb4576478

    Our end-users shouldn't see patch pop-ups from Microsoft, so I'm approving and pushing this patch as fast as I can. I only have one relevant PM membership group and this patch was already approved there; so that's good.

    SM on the other hand is a challenge. I have many different Scan and Analysis Profiles and each profile needs to find this new vulnerability and I need to jump in and approve it. By the time I scan and approve the user is already getting Notification Area activity.

    It takes effort to get users to leave their machines on for 2004, and now there's some extra communications needed after the fact.


  • Bill Jupena
    Bill Jupena Member
    edited November 2020

    Just came across this thread and trying to catch up and absorb everything. Does this script currently execute getting Windows 10 2004 update installed successfully? Has anyone tried it recently?  Thanks!

  • Parker Bass
    Parker Bass Member
    edited November 2020

    @Bill - we used this to upgrade quite a few machines to 2004 recently with no issue.

  • Andrew Trevisani
    edited November 2020

    same here

  • Derek Harlan
    Derek Harlan Member
    edited November 2020

    Been using it and it will update to 20H2 now.

  • Frans
    Frans Member
    edited November 2020

    @Bill - we used this but found it is a bit more temperamental now. I had to prerun a script to disable UAC to get this to work across the board. But after that, it worked on 99% of machines.

  • Frans
    Frans Member
    edited November 2020

    @Bill - we used this but found it is a bit more temperamental now. I had to prerun a script to disable UAC to get this to work across the board. But after that, it worked on 99% of machines.

  • John Morris
    John Morris Member CHOCOLATE MILK
    edited November 2020

    We have used this for several months and recently modified it to suit our needs further.  It's been a great starter procedure and the logging and error handling has been great.

  • Edwin
    Edwin Member
    edited November 2020

    @John Morris

    I'm looking to start using this script. Would you mind exporting and sharing your modified procedure with me? If so I would appreciate it as a leg up on deploying this to endpoints and hopefully avoiding costly pitfalls. My email is [email protected]

    Thank you in advance if you are willing!

  • Rey Marquez
    Rey Marquez Member
    edited November 2020

    I've been using this or a variation of this for years and it always works, even with UAC enabled. We have a mix of UAC and non-UAC endpoints.

    The only part that can hang is the restart, but I do a manual restart overnight anyway and that hasn't been an issue. Eventually, the restart will happen but it varies between 1, to a few hours.

    Out of hundreds of times the only thing this failed was once or twice because there was a patch pending. After installing those minor patches and then restarting, this procedure worked fine.

    If you have endpoints that haven't restarted in a long time you can restart prior to running this if you can run overnight.

    We have software that relies on the Windows builds and I've been running this script since 1903 up to 20H2.

  • Bill Jupena
    Bill Jupena Member
    edited December 2020

    @Parker & @ Frans -  thanks for your responses! The Author says that no file upload is needed that it will download the file form Microsoft. The current file on Microsoft is for 20H2. Will you please confirm that it is installing 2004 (20H1) and not 20H2? Thanks! 

  • Parker Bass
    Parker Bass Member
    edited December 2020

    @Bill - I believe it will download whatever the latest version from Microsoft is. May be wrong about that one though.

  • Bill Jupena
    Bill Jupena Member
    edited December 2020

    @Reza - THANK YOU for this procedure!  It would be great if you or someone would update the procedure with the recommendations and fixes posted in this discussion thread and have it perform a system restore point before proceeding with the OS upgrade, update Rapid Technology driver, and check to make sure that the target Win10 machine has at least 20 GB free before proceeding and if not terminate the procedure and provide that info.

    Also, will you please confirm that it does update to 2004 and not 20H2?

    I am always grateful for those of you that develop these procedures and share them to help the rest of us! I personally do not possess this skillset so this is VERY helpful to me.

    Will you or anyone out there consider updating the procedure?

    BIG THANKS in advance! And I hope everyone is staying healthy and doing well!




  • Bill Jupena
    Bill Jupena Member
    edited December 2020

    @Parker - that's what I'm thinking. We are trying to stay at N-1 to not not have to deal with the problems that surface with these releases. Although I haven't heard much of anything about bad issues with 20H2 so I'm thinking that it is safe to just go ahead and push it out. But in the future, to be able to rely on procedures like this that leverage and depend on Microsoft's engine, I am changing my practice to push out the "Current" update right before the next semi-annual "feature" (HAHA) update.

  • Jeff Lorenzen
    Jeff Lorenzen Boulder, COMember CHOCOLATE MILK
    edited December 2020

    The "fileless" version will always do the highest build available for that serial.  I had one i was trying to pop to 2004 from 1906 and couldn't figure out why it wasn't going until I looked at the logs.  It said something to the effect of "your manufacturer needs to send updates to your computer first"  

  • Derek Harlan
    Derek Harlan Member
    edited December 2020

    @Bill - It will push out 20H2, not 2004, and any subsequent versions released by Microsoft as the procedure calls the Windows Upgrade tool from a Microsoft URL so no way to force it to do a previously released version unless you change the procedure to use something other than the Upgrade tool. I used this extensively and as @Rey had mentioned only had a couple of issues and it was because there were other patches pending, but was easily resolved.

  • Karl Hague
    Karl Hague Member CHOCOLATE MILK
    edited December 2020

    You can control which version you upgrade to by downloading the upgrader you want.  We have a version of the procedure for each version we want to deploy.  We've confirmed time and again that each one gets you the specific version.  What makes it confusing is that Microsoft keeps releasing the upgrader with the same name but if you check the .exe closely you can see they're different. 

    Replace the download URL in the procedure with one of the following:

    1903: https://download.microsoft.com/download/9/6/4/96409c48-4ad8-4660-8482-0ca61f05d58b/Windows10Upgrade9252.exe

    1909: https://download.microsoft.com/download/9/b/f/9bf08afb-bfd8-488a-9ce6-90134cea4d8f/Windows10Upgrade9252.exe

    2004: https://download.microsoft.com/download/8/3/c/83c39dca-2d27-4c24-b98b-0a4d6d921c80/Windows10Upgrade9252.exe

    2009/20H2: https://download.microsoft.com/download/7/a/a/7aa0472b-49a0-46d1-b651-e8a2c53f1fe4/Windows10Upgrade9252.exe

    Hope this helps for those who don't necessarily want to always deploy the latest version.


  • Bill Jupena
    Bill Jupena Member
    edited December 2020

    @Karl - THANKS!

  • Bill Jupena
    Bill Jupena Member
    edited December 2020

    Has anyone updated the procedure to have it perform a system restore point before proceeding with the OS upgrade, update Rapid Technology driver, and check to make sure that the target Win10 machine has at least 20 GB free before proceeding and if not terminate the procedure and provide that info?

  • KaseyaUser
    KaseyaUser Member CHOCOLATE MILK
    edited December 2020

    I found these step by step instructions to add the steps to a kaseya procedure and which output free space to the procedure log.  If you added these before the other steps, you would have extra info to diagnose why the procedure may have not completed.


  • Jeff Lorenzen
    Jeff Lorenzen Boulder, COMember CHOCOLATE MILK
    edited December 2020

    @Karl Hague  Brilliant!

    Bill Jupena, yes!  We use a command shell line: 

    wmic /namespace:\\root\default path SystemRestore call CreateRestorePoint "Pre-Win 10 Build Upgrade", 100, 0

  • KaseyaUser
    KaseyaUser Member CHOCOLATE MILK
    edited December 2020

    1. According this to this Microsoft article features are now pushed out through Windows Update (for Windows 10 1903 and later).  https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2019/07/01/evolving-windows-10-servicing-and-quality-the-next-steps/


    2. If using group policy to control updates, I changed the “Windows readiness level for updates” as follows:



    Computer Configuration > Policies > Administrative
    Template > Windows Settings > Windows Updates > Windows Updates for
    Business

    Microsoft link

    From: Semi-Annual Channel for 1809 and below (Deprecated)

    To: Semi-Annual
    Channel

    This then made it so that the majority of PCs updated to the next available version of Windows 10 on their own.

    As explained in this article (link) the current behavior of Windows 10
    feature updates is that they are only pushed out as the PCs version of Windows 10 approaches its end of life (again for Windows 10 1903 and later).


    3. Finally, you can configure deadlines to make sure PCs update on their own, with increasing invasive warnings to a user.  (Note that this is an advanced article.)

     https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/deployment/update/wufb-compliancedeadlines

    (You want to set up the group policy to adding users to a security group can exempt them from these deadlines, if major issues would happen to the user's PC if it was rebooted without a user's approved.)



  • KaseyaUser
    KaseyaUser Member CHOCOLATE MILK
    edited December 2020

    Here is the link I forgot to include, for the comment below:

    http://community.kaseya.com/xsp/f/28/t/6453.aspx

    -----

    I found these step by step instructions to add the steps to a kaseya procedure and which output free space to the procedure log.  If you added these before the other steps, you would have extra info to diagnose why the procedure may have not completed.



  • Rick Rodriguez
    edited December 2020

    @Karl Hague, great insight.  Do you know if multiple URLs work for the same release?  After I downloaded from https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=799445 today my browser's download history listed https://download.microsoft.com/download/2/b/b/2bba292a-21c3-42a6-8123-98265faff0b6/Windows10Upgrade9252.exe.

  • Karl Hague
    Karl Hague Member CHOCOLATE MILK
    edited December 2020

    @Rick Rodriguez, I'm afraid I don't know. Maybe they've released a new version of the Updater that still deploys 20H2 but has new fixes in it.  My 20H2 link for Windows10Upgrade9252.exe has a build number of 1.4.9200.23192 with an Authenticode date of 2020-10-05.  Your Windows10Upgrade9252.exe is build 1.4.9200.23258 with an Authenticode date of 2020-12-10, both of which are dates after the release of 20H2 and obviously before the future release of 21H1.  Checking the "Digital Signatures" (ie. Authenticode) date from the properties of the .exe file is how I usually assume which version is deploying which build of Win10.

    When 21H1 comes out be sure to capture the URL to download.microsoft.com before 21H2 comes out because it becomes nearly impossible to find a link to an old version once they release the new version.  They replace all of their links with the new one.

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